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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I swapped to some nice, sticky all-weather Michelin Pilot Exalto tires and now find that the car oversteers. It's great on the twisty roads near home but makes the car a bit uncomfortably unstable on highway sweepers at 70 mph. Unfortunately, I've serached the forums and can't seem to find an answer before I simply start experimenting myself.

It feels like the car drops its outside front corner and that's causing the inside rear to unweight (not lift off the ground) too much. On tight curves, the car is in a steady oversteering attitude. I can feel the suspension as it definitely assumes a set when I hit a turn aggressively.

The suspension is all aligned to specs. The front swaybar is 25 mm, not sure about the rear. The new tires now have 5,000 mi. on them. The car has KYB gas struts with 6,000 miles on them. There are no other mods.

I'm looking for the simplest solutions. I've tried different tire pressures and the best result seems to be 36/36 psi F/R.

I'm reluctant to go to a bigger front bar (even if I could find one). Changing springs would be a real pain. I was thinking about disconnecting the rear swaybar. Has anyone done this and achieved positive results.
 

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What you want is stiffer springs and its not a pain you can do the whole car in 2 hours with air tools.
 

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if your running stock spring rates your going to have quite a bit of weight transfer and being that you have a wagon you have a lot of weight up top in back which is going to cause an even more dramatic weight transfer from the rear.

Running a stiffer lowering spring all around is going to lower your center of gravity and won't allow such a dramatic weight transfer. This will at least limit the body roll induced oversteer your experiencing. With the limited roll your going to being using more of the tire getting better traction at all corners.

Disconnecting the rear bar will only allow the rear of the car to roll more, which is your problem to begin with. A bigger front bar will help shift even more balance to the front tires but you will suffer from more understeer initially before the rear decides to break loose.

Now, i've never driven an elantra wagon but have driven older and newer sedans and they typically understeer the majority of the time which is why most of the xd guys will swap to a 19mm rear sway bar off a gk v6 tib.

So, what i'm saying up top is just speculation because the best advice I could give you is from the driver's seat of your car. I know some springs would help your situation. If it cures your oversteering problem but causes more understeer than you can always shift more handling to the rear with the 19mm bar mentioned above.

hope this helps
 

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Try lowering the pressure in the rear tires 3-4 PSI. I had an Elantra wagon with Eibach lowering springs on KYB GR-2 struts, the 19mm rear sway bar other people talked about, and sticky summer tires. Never had oversteer problems. The car was very neutral when cornering.

Also, most Elantras will lift their inside rear wheel when cornering very aggressively at speed (auto-x).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Results of disconnecting rear sway bar

The result of disconnecting the sway bar is that almost all of the oversteer is gone unless I really plow hard into a sharp turn. Then, overteer comes on but only moderately. Straightline stability is just great now on the interstates and those big sweepers no longer are white-knucklers.

The marked oversteer and straight-line "twitchiness" on the superslabs really started when I installed all-weather Michelin Pilot Exalto tires. Previously I had had Goodyear Integrity tires which were definitely not high-traction tires. The new tires work great for general driving in all weather condictions.

The problem with the elantra wagon is that it is softly sprung and it has weight high and to the rear -- as someone noted above.

With the rear sway bar disconnected, the rear is able to roll without picking up/unweighting the inside rear wheel. The new, sticky tire obviously exacerbated that characteristic with the sway bar connected.

Slow turns like you might encounter in an autocross do produce significant understeer, but in the normal driving world it's not a problem.

This car is a 120 mile a day commuter -- half on superslabs, and half on some very twisty and challenging roads. The car reall would benefit from stiffer springs, but my $0.00 improvement is all that I really need. Actually more than springs, it could use a good driver's seat!
 

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good to hear you resolved your problem

i agree that most hyundai seats could use some improving

I don't think i'd ever want to try autocrossing my daily driven accent without my 4pt harness I would wind up outside of the car.
 
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