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I was set on purchasing a 2008 Elantra, but a day or two I just caught the end of a news story on a hugh recall on Elantras because of a faulty fuel pump. Does anyone have more details?
 

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I was set on purchasing a 2008 Elantra, but a day or two I just caught the end of a news story on a hugh recall on Elantras because of a faulty fuel pump. Does anyone have more details?
It is not a recall at this point. NHTSA is doing an investigation on reports of 4 failure reports with 1 causing a collision where the car was travelling 65 mph and suddenly stalled which slowed the vehicle fast enough to cause cars to collide with it.

There is a problem withthe fuel pump suddenly dropping pressure intermittently. At first report, the fuel regulator was reportedly leaking, but now Hyundai says it is the pump that is faulty. Hyundai has redesigned the pump and has replaced over 1,000 pump assemblies due to stalling on the 07-08 Elantras.

NHTSA figures that the problem exists on 170,000 vehicles.
 

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I was set on purchasing a 2008 Elantra, but a day or two I just caught the end of a news story on a hugh recall on Elantras because of a faulty fuel pump. Does anyone have more details?
There is no recall at this time. If you car is running fine don't worry. If you notice sputtering or stalling, take it to the dealer to have the pump replaced. IF this does become a recall, Hyundai will notify you by mail to bring the car in.

NHTSA figures that the problem exists on 170,000 vehicles.
That is incorrect. Hyundai sold approx 170,000 Elantras but that doesn't mean NHTSA believes the problem exists on all of them. Right now only 4 have been reported. Big difference.
 

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That is incorrect. Hyundai sold approx 170,000 Elantras but that doesn't mean NHTSA believes the problem exists on all of them. Right now only 4 have been reported. Big difference.
4 were reported (by owner) to the NHTSA. I know that Derek on EXD has replaced 15 himself. The possibility of affected vehicles is 170,000. Owners report to NHTSA. Dealers do not do that even if they replace many pumps. HMA will have to disclose how many they already have replaced to NHTSA so the agency can decide that there is a problem.
 

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4 were reported (by owner) to the NHTSA. I know that Derek on EXD has replaced 15 himself. The possibility of affected vehicles is 170,000. Owners report to NHTSA. Dealers do not do that even if they replace many pumps. HMA will have to disclose how many they already have replaced to NHTSA so the agency can decide that there is a problem.
^^ Key word: possibility

4 have been reported. This is NOT a safety issue, it is a warranty/recall issue. IF Hyundai feels the need to recall the Elantra they will notify owners. So far, they have not. It appears to be a local problem in Florida and California right now. That meand the problem is probably isolated to a small batch of cars produced and shipped to those states.

Stop scaring people Chicken Little. The sky isn't falling.
 

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Hi I felt the same way as Ormondron. I wanted a 2008 Elantra and am now concerned about the fuel pump issue.

Are you sure this problem is limited to California and Florida. On the Edmund forum it seems that were others who had this problem, in NY and VA.

Also it seems there were more than 4 complaints, at least unofficially on: 2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Consumer Complaint
 

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^^ Key word: possibility

4 have been reported. This is NOT a safety issue, it is a warranty/recall issue. IF Hyundai feels the need to recall the Elantra they will notify owners. So far, they have not. It appears to be a local problem in Florida and California right now. That meand the problem is probably isolated to a small batch of cars produced and shipped to those states.

Stop scaring people Chicken Little. The sky isn't falling.
It may not be just a local problem. That is what the NHTSA is trying to find out. I know Derek on EXD said he personally replaced 15 fuel pump assemblies in his dealer shop and another EClub member saying there were 11 failures at the dealer he went to with a failed pump (in NY State). 26 failures in 2 dealers is abnormal no matter how you look at it. That number in 2 separate dealerships in different states does raise the question of is there a problem? Derek also said that the new pump is a different design, which means that the old design likey was faulty.

Are you sure this problem is limited to California and Florida. On the Edmund forum it seems that were others who had this problem, in NY and VA.

Also it seems there were more than 4 complaints, at least unofficially on: 2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Consumer Complaint
Unofficially, there likely is more complaints. Officially, 4 complaints to NHTSA were made by owners. A dealer does not have to report to NHTSA. All reports come from owners.

By redesigning the fuel pump, Hyundai admits there is a problem with the fuel pump.

You think only 4 reports/failures have been made. If you learn to read right, you will find that there are more than 4 failures. I read about 26 failures in 2 different dealers in 2 states, Florida and NY State. NY is not in California or Florida.
 

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Again, this is not a SAFETY issue. It's is a warranty issue and possibly a recall issue in the future. Just because someone owns an HD elantra doesn't mean they will have a fuel pump problem. If it dies, go to the dealer to get it fixed under warranty. If Hyundai feels the need to recall the HD then they will contact the owners to bring in their cars.

You are Chicken Little crying the sky is falling. It's not.
 

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Again, this is not a SAFETY issue. It's is a warranty issue and possibly a recall issue in the future. Just because someone owns an HD elantra doesn't mean they will have a fuel pump problem. If it dies, go to the dealer to get it fixed under warranty. If Hyundai feels the need to recall the HD then they will contact the owners to bring in their cars.

You are Chicken Little crying the sky is falling. It's not.
I don't know, I see my car stalling on a freeway as a safety issue.
 

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I don't know, I see my car stalling on a freeway as a safety issue.
Then you need to learn how to drive. Dealing with a stalled car at highway speeds is not a big deal. I've had it happen a few times and it's very easy to pull over to the shoulder and stop. If you can't handle that, you shouldn't be driving.
 

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Hi all,

This is a hot topic about Elantra engine stalling. My worries lead me to search more related news and updates. You may also refer to Malaysia's forum. I am from Malaysia, this local model is called Elantra X20. Myself as a X20 owner already experienced the engine stalled problem ONCE while the car is less a month old after collected it from dealer. A bit more detail, here goes: X20 mati engine...;)
In our forum, already 5 members reported the same problem.
 

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Then you need to learn how to drive. Dealing with a stalled car at highway speeds is not a big deal. I've had it happen a few times and it's very easy to pull over to the shoulder and stop. If you can't handle that, you shouldn't be driving.
So let's say i'm on a four lane highway, in the fast lane all the way over to the left, against the concrete median (which is where I normally travel) and my car stalls. I now have three other lanes of traffic to cross with an average speed of 120 kmph. Regardless of how I drive, I still need to cross three lanes of traffic and need to depend on the skill and cooperation of other drivers on the road to ensure I can even get across. In most cases, as soon as I hit my four-way flashers i'll have people hitting their horns, yelling and trying to pass me which creates a huge bottleneck, and safety hazard, on the highway.

I could be a perfect driver, but stalling on a highway is a huge safety issue because you need to consider the reactions of other drivers.

Don't mistake someone's warning as fear mongering when it's a legitimate safety issue.
 

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So let's say i'm on a four lane highway, in the fast lane all the way over to the left, against the concrete median (which is where I normally travel)
Keep right except to pass.


and my car stalls. I now have three other lanes of traffic to cross with an average speed of 120 kmph. Regardless of how I drive, I still need to cross three lanes of traffic and need to depend on the skill and cooperation of other drivers on the road to ensure I can even get across. In most cases, as soon as I hit my four-way flashers i'll have people hitting their horns, yelling and trying to pass me which creates a huge bottleneck, and safety hazard, on the highway.
When a car stalls it does not stop dead. If you are going as fast as you claim, you should have no problem coasting over. I've done it. Yes, it will piss people off but it happen every day.


I could be a perfect driver, but stalling on a highway is a huge safety issue because you need to consider the reactions of other drivers.

Don't mistake someone's warning as fear mongering when it's a legitimate safety issue.
It's NOT a safety issue. It's a warranty issue. He's telling all HD drivers that there is a safety issue when there isn't. A small handfull of cars have reported problems, that's all. His "sky is falling" attitude is causing panic when there needs not be.
 

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I don't know, I see my car stalling on a freeway as a safety issue.
Exactly. INSTEAD of the engine pushing the wheels, the wheels push the engine. Car slows down very quickly.

Then you need to learn how to drive. Dealing with a stalled car at highway speeds is not a big deal. I've had it happen a few times and it's very easy to pull over to the shoulder and stop. If you can't handle that, you shouldn't be driving.
Technically,when a car stalls out and I'm next to it, I don't HAVE to yield to it. That stalling issue legally is impeding traffic, which is a moving violation as well as a defective equipment charge. The stall causes a car to abruptly slow down and impede the normal traffic flow.

So let's say i'm on a four lane highway, in the fast lane all the way over to the left, against the concrete median (which is where I normally travel) and my car stalls. I now have three other lanes of traffic to cross with an average speed of 120 kmph. Regardless of how I drive, I still need to cross three lanes of traffic and need to depend on the skill and cooperation of other drivers on the road to ensure I can even get across. In most cases, as soon as I hit my four-way flashers i'll have people hitting their horns, yelling and trying to pass me which creates a huge bottleneck, and safety hazard, on the highway.

I could be a perfect driver, but stalling on a highway is a huge safety issue because you need to consider the reactions of other drivers.

Don't mistake someone's warning as fear mongering when it's a legitimate safety issue.
Legally, you have to pull over to the right not left.

When a car stalls it does not stop dead. If you are going as fast as you claim, you should have no problem coasting over. I've done it. Yes, it will piss people off but it happen every day.
So you tell me the engine pushes the wheels when it is not running? Not so. It takes up to 2-4 seconds for a driver to disengage the clutch. That time frame is enough to slow a car significantly. Even on the automatic, at freeway speeds the wheels push the engine.
 

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Exactly. INSTEAD of the engine pushing the wheels, the wheels push the engine. Car slows down very quickly.
A stalled car slows down about as quickly as a light application of the brakes. I've explained this to you on 3 different forums and you are still not getting this. You should not be driving or giving out automotive advice.


Technically,when a car stalls out and I'm next to it, I don't HAVE to yield to it. That stalling issue legally is impeding traffic, which is a moving violation as well as a defective equipment charge. The stall causes a car to abruptly slow down and impede the normal traffic flow.
Wrong again. Stopping in traffic on purpose is illegal and impeding traffic. Stopping in traffic because of a problem is NOT a moving violation. And yes, when you are next to a car in trouble, you do have to yield to it. You always yield to a vehicle in trouble.


So you tell me the engine pushes the wheels when it is not running? Not so. It takes up to 2-4 seconds for a driver to disengage the clutch. That time frame is enough to slow a car significantly. Even on the automatic, at freeway speeds the wheels push the engine.
Learn how a car works before posting on automotive forums.

First, the majority of cars (and Elantras) in the US are automatics. The torque converter in an automatic will prevent the wheels from trying to turn the engine and all you have to do is step on the clutch with a manual trans. If you can't do that, you suck at driving and shouldn't be behind the wheel.

Have you even push-started a manual trans car? The engine is not moving (ie: stalled), the clutch is disengaged and you push the car. When you get enough speed you pop the clutch and the momentum of the car moving is turning the wheels which is turning the transmission and turning the clutch. When the clutch engages the flywheel it starts to turn the engine and then the engine starts. If a stalled engine locked the drive wheels then you wouldn't be able to do this.

Here's something for you to try if you have an automatic: with the engine off and he car on level ground, put the car in drive and try to push the car. You can because the wheels are not locked. If 1 or 2 guys can still push the car, the momentum of a 2+ ton car will easily do it. If the wheels locked, you wouldn't be able to move the car or drive wheels.

You are yelling "FIRE" in a crowded room. What do you want HD owners to do? Stop driving their cars? That's poor advice. Do you want them to go to theire dealers and request a working pump to be replaced? Hyundai won't do that unless they issue a recall.

Bottom line: if your HD is running fine, don't worry. If you notice stalling, go to your dealer and ask them to replace the pump. Simple, easy and not causing a panic.
 

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First, the majority of cars (and Elantras) in the US are automatics. The torque converter in an automatic will prevent the wheels from trying to turn the engine and all you have to do is step on the clutch with a manual trans. If you can't do that, you suck at driving and shouldn't be behind the wheel.
It takes up to 2-4 seconds to put a trans in neutral. It also takes the same amount of time to push in the clutch. Most people drive with both hands on the wheel; and last check of the laws, you should have both hands on the wheel. I have 1 hand on my gas/brake control and the other on the steering knob. In ORDER for meto put a car in neutral, I must transfer one hand to the wheel before releasing the steering knob.

I can also start a car with an automatic by pushing the car (40 mph+). The output shaft does turn the internals fast enough to pressurize the fluid and when the fluid pressure is up, it will make the torque converter turn the engine. At 60-65 mph, the pressure is high enough to start a car in drive. At 40 mph, I can start the engine by dropping the trans in 2nd gear.

Wrong again. Stopping in traffic on purpose is illegal and impeding traffic. Stopping in traffic because of a problem is NOT a moving violation. And yes, when you are next to a car in trouble, you do have to yield to it. You always yield to a vehicle in trouble.
Wrong. Impeding traffic is slowing traffic down by any means that is below the flow of traffic or under the posted limit. Slow drivers impede traffic. Same thing occurs when slower drivers attempt to merge into a faster lane. In a lane of traffic, when changing lanes, drivers must yield to those drivers in the lane they want to move into. Drivers outside of the lane you are in do not have to yield to you. You have to merge into the lane you want to get into by maintaining the speed of the existing traffic flow of that particular lane. If the lane you are in is travelling 50 mph and the lane you need to go into is travelling 60 mph, you must increase your speed before merging into that lane. Disabled cars do have to yield to faster traffic. They can't just merge in front of faster traffic (called failure to yield).


Here's something for you to try if you have an automatic: with the engine off and he car on level ground, put the car in drive and try to push the car. You can because the wheels are not locked. If 1 or 2 guys can still push the car, the momentum of a 2+ ton car will easily do it. If the wheels locked, you wouldn't be able to move the car or drive wheels.
Going fast enough, you can start the engine. I've started a 62 Ranchero with an automatic by going 25 mph. Newer cars require a faster speed to get the pressures up due to the electronics and different design of the line pressure system. At certain speeds, the modern torque converter is electronically locked up which connects the impeller in the torque converter to the input shaft of the transmission. On the XD, this is 35 mph in 3rd and 4th gear.
 

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It takes up to 2-4 seconds to put a trans in neutral. It also takes the same amount of time to push in the clutch.
Maybe for you but not a skilled driver.


Most people drive with both hands on the wheel; and last check of the laws, you should have both hands on the wheel.
Then I guess it's illegal to drive a manual car unless you can shift with your knee.


I have 1 hand on my gas/brake control and the other on the steering knob. In ORDER for meto put a car in neutral, I must transfer one hand to the wheel before releasing the steering knob.
What the hell are you talking about? One hand on the gas/brake? You use your feet for the gas and brake. Are you handicapped and use hand controls? That would explain A LOT.


Wrong. Impeding traffic is slowing traffic down by any means that is below the flow of traffic or under the posted limit. Slow drivers impede traffic.
Yes, if it was for any reason OTHER than someone having trouble with their car. You can not impede traffic on purpose but that does not count when a car is disabled.


Same thing occurs when slower drivers attempt to merge into a faster lane. In a lane of traffic, when changing lanes, drivers must yield to those drivers in the lane they want to move into. Drivers outside of the lane you are in do not have to yield to you. You have to merge into the lane you want to get into by maintaining the speed of the existing traffic flow of that particular lane. If the lane you are in is travelling 50 mph and the lane you need to go into is travelling 60 mph, you must increase your speed before merging into that lane. Disabled cars do have to yield to faster traffic. They can't just merge in front of faster traffic (called failure to yield).
WRONG!!!! If you see a disabled car you should yield. Only an a$$hole wouldn't yield to a disabled vehicle trying to get out of the way of traffic and to safely on the side of the road.
 

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What the hell are you talking about? One hand on the gas/brake? You use your feet for the gas and brake. Are you handicapped and use hand controls? That would explain A LOT.
I have hand controls. Complete remote brake and gas control.

Yes, if it was for any reason OTHER than someone having trouble with their car. You can not impede traffic on purpose but that does not count when a car is disabled.
That driver cannot change lanes until it is safe to do so. They can be cited for a number of things; improper lane travel, improper lane change, and failure to yield. Changing lanes in front of faster moving traffic to pull over (even when being pulled over) cannot be done without regard to safe movement. If a car moving slower than the flow of traffic needs to move to the right, and the traffic on the right is moving faster, the slower moving vehicle cannot move over unless there is enough distance between cars to safely move over and pull over to the shoulder of the road. It is a moving violation to change lanes from one lane and move to a 3rd lane without pausing in the middle lane. If I was on a 8 lane highway and I'm on the 3rd lane (2nd from the left lane) and I need to get to the far right lane, in any circumstance, I cannot move over regardless of speed unless I travel a certain distance in each lane even if my car is not running. That is a improper lane change if that process is not done.
 

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That driver cannot change lanes until it is safe to do so. They can be cited for a number of things; improper lane travel, improper lane change, and failure to yield. Changing lanes in front of faster moving traffic to pull over (even when being pulled over) cannot be done without regard to safe movement. If a car moving slower than the flow of traffic needs to move to the right, and the traffic on the right is moving faster, the slower moving vehicle cannot move over unless there is enough distance between cars to safely move over and pull over to the shoulder of the road. It is a moving violation to change lanes from one lane and move to a 3rd lane without pausing in the middle lane. If I was on a 8 lane highway and I'm on the 3rd lane (2nd from the left lane) and I need to get to the far right lane, in any circumstance, I cannot move over regardless of speed unless I travel a certain distance in each lane even if my car is not running. That is a improper lane change if that process is not done.
That is true if your car is operating properly. In an emergency situation where the car is obviously disabled, traffic should yield to the troubled car.

But since you want to talk laws, let's discuss the law that clearly states that traffic must keep to the right lane and only use the left lane to pass. If you stay right and the car stalls you don't have to cross traffic to get over. And on the chance that the car stalls when trying to pass, the left lane will be clear behind you because like you said:
In a lane of traffic, when changing lanes, drivers must yield to those drivers in the lane they want to move into. Drivers outside of the lane you are in do not have to yield to you. You have to merge into the lane you want to get into by maintaining the speed of the existing traffic flow of that particular lane. If the lane you are in is travelling 50 mph and the lane you need to go into is travelling 60 mph, you must increase your speed before merging into that lane.
So, since you want to follow the exact letter of the law, stay out of the left lanes. If you keep right and have a problem you will be able to pull over.

Stop giving out automotive advice because you don't know what you are talking about.
 
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