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Discussion Starter #1
ok i need someone's help installing a camber kit...... i don't want any responses like "its just a bolt, bolt it on! :smoking:" NO, i want some actual good instructions and experience with the camber kit, like.... how tight are these things supposed to be tightened? and....... how am i suppose to install it since i am replacing my shock/springs within the next week?, so please give me some detail on this and make me realize it's easy for any beginner installing a camber kit. I plan to goto an alignment shop after im done with the install and get an alignment done with me sitting in the passenger seat, so please any information would be greatly appreciated, thank you
 

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the Ingalls kit I have (same for all Hyun exc Sonata) came with the recommended torque specs of 55-60 ft-lbs.

for starters you can just replace the upper bolt with the offset cam facing outwards to push the knuckle out. it will have to be fussed with & rotated while the alignment equipment is hooked up to dial in the setting you want.
 

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I can now answer "yes" to the thread title question. finally did it today, getting ready to take it to a shop to take care of it.


the kit, 1 per side:




the intstructions state:
"Install the tab washer onto the Fastcam with the bolt head arrow pointing away from the washer handle and the washer tab pointing away from the bolt head so the washer tab is nestled in the space between the bolt head and cam lobe."

:puzzled: extra verbiage = confusion

the face of the bolt and the tab have the arrow markings. make them point away from one another - easy enough. the washer tab is not exactly "nestled" between the cam lobe. the washer inside diameter is fairly larger than the OD of the bolt, you just push the tab portion up against the bolt:



that tab fits into the bolt hole on your strut.


here it is all tightened up:


arrows & tab facing away from one another.

the arrow on the bolt head is where the fattest part of the offset cam lobe is, facing it directly outwards pushes the top of the knuckle out to correct the negative camber that resulted from the lowering springs. it is supposed to provide up to 1.5* adjustment.

[Edited by pucci on Mar 23, 2006 5:26 AM]
 

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I should have put the camera on a tripod so it took the before & after shot from same exact spot, but I didn't think about it untill afterwards. but despite the slight difference in viewpoint you can still see the actual change.


before:




after:




it almost looks like I have a little positive camber now. it's hard to tell tho, my driveway is kind of lumpy and uneven. I drove it around afterwards and parked somewhere else flat and it looked normal and straight up.

I'll find out for sure once a shop does the alignment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
very nice man, this should be stickied, i like the pictures and all, thats the kind of detail i wanted for this install, thank you very much man;):
 

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with strut based cars, once the car is lowered to the point of the control arm being horizontal, as the suspension compresses the camber will become more possitive; so it's usually best to dial in more negative camber to start with so you don't wear out the outside edges of your tires(how much negative camber depends on your driving habits)
 

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according to the shop, I still had some negative camber on the pass side and the caster was out of spec. they think the car had been in an accident and wanted to enlarge the bj holes on the control arm & also the upper strut hole to get it in spec. I didn't have them do that.

they got everything close as possible and it's good enough for now.
 

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hey kennman. I have them on my setup, You can see it in "Showroom" here or in Hyundai forum Cro where you are registred ;)
 

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okay so let me get this straightened out : the positive camber is, when upper part of the wheel is more out than lower.
negative camber is, when upper parts od wheels are closer together than lower ones.
WHY would you want to correct the negative camber, as I see on all sport cars, they have pretty much big negative camber!? also a lot of BMWs have neg. camber on rear wheels...it DOES improve traction in curves,right? okay it has a side effect of eating more of the inner side of tire, but in sporty driving, it really helps, right? what are your experiences in that?
are you guys correcting camber to positive only to preserve the tyre?

i'm a bit confused...
 

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c/p

- Greater cornering speed by maintaining a flatter contact patch between outside tyres and the road- Reduced understeer- Also beneficial in reducing tyre scrubbing under the guards when wide, low profile tyres are fitted

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- Replaces upper clevis bolt to provide +/- 1.5 degrees of camber
 

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1e0n said:




c/p

- Greater cornering speed by maintaining a flatter contact patch between outside tyres and the road- Reduced understeer- Also beneficial in reducing tyre scrubbing under the guards when wide, low profile tyres are fitted

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- Replaces upper clevis bolt to provide +/- 1.5 degrees of camber
okay, but that doesnt answer my question. As I know, virtually all of the sprot cars have a neg. camber fot better peformance and traction in bends/curves.
why would someone want a positive camber? is it really only economy wise to do it when lowering your car with sport springs? ONLY to try to save on your tires?
opinions welcome!
 
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