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My one friend just bought a 83 Lincoln Town Car, and we were replacing worn parts, Brakes shocks and such. He suggested not opening up the bleeders and just pushing the piston back into the caliper.
I did that but I didn't remove the top of the master cylinder (he said that is bad) and after all is said and done and everything is back together, he said his brake pedal goes down much farther than it used to, but everything works fine.

I was just curious if there is a solution to this, or if I might of messed something up.
 

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All you did was change the pads? I always just push the piston back in I only bleed if I take the caliper off. Did he pump the brakes a few times, when you first try to brake the pedal should go all the way to the floor after a few pumps it should be okay. Maybe you can try adding a little fluid or taking the pads back off and letting the pistons push out he taking the top off the master cylinder and putting the pads back on if you think that would help you much.
 

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Yeah, replacing pads should not require bleeding the brakes. It's a good idea because you more than likely have old overheated brake fluid near the caliper, but it should not cause the pedal to have a longer throw after installing new pads as you did. It's not a good thing to compress the piston with the cap on the master cylinder, but it also should not cause this problem. Maybe the new pads are less grippy or are not yet broken in properly. I would let him try to get used to it for a few days at least before taking any action unless it seems to be a safety issue.
 

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I have some questions that regard this topic. I'm going to change my rotors and pads soon and I understand I need to take the calipers out (or move them). Can I just move them so I don't need to deal with the brake fluid? Since I'm not very experienced I don't want to take risks to mess up everything on my brakes system. Also, do I need any special tools to push the pistons or anything else? Do I need to lubricate something?
Any answer will be really appreciated.
Thanks
 

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I haven't chagned brake on a tib ever but I haven't hit a car that was too much different. There is a screw on one side of the caliber normally back of the front brake and front of the back brakes. undo that flip the caliper open,(rotate on the screw that was left in) then unclip the pads both sides, take cap off master cylinder push the piston back in I use a block of wood and a clamp normally. don't use pliers on directly on teh piston. Change the rotors they are normally just have I all the grip washers take those off put the new rotors on and put the new pad in. Put everything back together, pump your brakes while the car is not moving before you drive the car the first time.

If I left anything out someone please correct me, if you have questions ask and I can answer them or someone will.
 

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^^What he said, except that you will need a special tool for the rear calipers on most cars (but I'm not positive about the Tib). The tool is just generally a cube looking deal with several projections each side to hook into the indentations on the rear caliper piston to allow you to wind the piston back up inside. It will just hook up to a 3/8" socket extension usually. Do not attempt to compress the rear piston unless there are no indentations for using the keyed tool to back them up into the caliper. Also on the rears there will be an attachment for the e-brake cable that you will have to unhook before you'll be able to get the caliper to come loose.

If the caliper has to come all the way off (some do) then you will want something to tie the caliper up out of the way, it's very bad to let the caliper dangle at the end of the brake line.

And just to make it clear you will not have to bleed the brakes if you do not unhook the brake lines. It is a good idea, but not necessary. You may need to drain fluid out of the brake master cylinder though if the fluid has been topped off since new pads were last installed. If you have to drain fluid I've found a simple way is to take a paper towel and dip it into the resevoir and directly place it into a container while still inside the engine compartment. This takes out a significant amount of fluid really easily. Do not drip brake fluid on your paint because it will remove paint.
 

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With an 83, I would bleed the brakes. Brake fluid is hygroscopic and should be replaced at least every 3 years at a minimum.
It's not that hard to do, even DIY, it just requires 2 people... one to sit on the pedal and one to open the bleeder...
 

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Thanks for the advices, I'm going to start buying the necessary things soon and I'll ask if I have more questions. I hope I don't screw anything.
Cheers
 
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