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Beatiful... I LOVE it.

Also, pretend there is an egg under you feet, as long as you are fluid you are doing it well.

They have tested the smoothness factor in racing and when you have two different drives, same car, the smoother one was able to post a full SECOND faster time. It was incrediable. They had G-meters in the car and you can see on the graphs the change.

yeah, and on the brakeing thing.. try being able to stop the car at lights so smooth that your head dosent move, or the hood doesnt go up. Once you can do that with easy force, start brakeing harder and see if you can still get the equal motion.
I start off easy, then shove that pedal down (when braking hard) and pull up and let off easy. So if you could graph the pedal force if would look like a upside down U not a V. Does that make sense? Smoothness is the key, easy smooth even motions with everything in the car.

Thats all i can think of...
 

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The racing vehicle. of any vintage, of any brand, of any kind, is not a tool; it is a weapon. author unknown, but correct. Tools are benign, weapons aren't.

The skill of racing is not how fast you go but how not slow you go. courtesy of Brian Redmond.
 

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mahout said:
The racing vehicle. of any vintage, of any brand, of any kind, is not a tool; it is a weapon. author unknown, but correct. Tools are benign, weapons aren't.
Pretty damned right. I just wish more people on the roads understood just this statement, and how it also applies to street cars. Thus, it is important to learn the safest and quickest way to use your vehicle. Example;

I recently inroduced a friend of mine to driving on prepared surfaces. This is a fellow who is well-steeped in mountan runs and street "racing." I reckoned he wouldn't have any problem. I was wrong; from the get go his street "race" mentality had him throwing the car at the turns, thus he complained of severe understeer.
  • He didn't know how to brake properly; he was dragging the brakes into the turns
  • He was fiddly with the wheel, and shifting his hands too much
  • He was treating the accelrator like an on-off switch
When we got around that together, he'd sworn off the street and was asking when the next timed Sprints are going to be held.

This is a bloke who, at the end of the day, turned a lethal weapon into a precision tool. ONE LESS STREET RACER!
 

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No, if you mesh correctly it will not damage your transmission if you clutch smoothly. However, if you shift down from too high a gear you will wreck your engine due to over-rev. You may also damage your engine mounts due to the drivetrain shock if you do not match the revs to make the transition smoother.

In modern cars however, the engine brake is less important because the stock brake systems are already very efficient. It is not necessary to use the engine brake as much as with an older car without ABS; so simply brake hard, scrub off enough speed, blip down(see heel-and-toe downshift article) then release the brake and turn the car in.
 

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Nice post. Thanks for taking the time and making the effort to do that.
 

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that was a awesome 101...

it's like grassroot's motorsport, my beta accent handles a bit differently than it used to be before the swap.

as for that spammer..somebody ban the Mu#ther#er before he poison's other threads.
 
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