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I heard someone talking today at the gas station when they got some kinda spiffy motor from japan dropped into there EX civic that they were going to convert to a dry sump system.. they said it would add horse power and qicken rev times because the crank is sloshing through oil. Is there any truth to this?


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Yup, it will free up horses. It will also add weight with reservoir, oil pump(s) and lines, but the HP gain should be worth it.


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There are a couple of bad things associated with a dry sump, one it runs buy a belt and adapting the components for oddball use is expensive. There are horsepower gains to be had, but at a added cost. It would be hard to say what you would get on a hyundai 4 cyl., on a small block chevy its net worth is around 20hp give or take a little bit. It isn't a dry sump, but you can build a pan with a kick out, diamond windage tray, baffling and a crank scraper and pick up a few horsepower. With the dry sump you would need a pan with 2 or 3 suction lines, mount the pump and run it with a cog built, remove the oil pump and build a adapter for the oil supply, mount the reservoir and tie in the return and supply lines. A friend of mine that use run Top Alcohol Dragster, lost a dry sump belt at 500ft and we spent 45 minutes cleaning up oil and engine parts.


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ok how does a dry sump system work anyways?
 

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In a wet sump engine oil is stored in the sump and pumped through the oil galleries of the engine from there.
In a dry sump engine oil is stored in a tank outside the engine(in most race cars this is in the boot) and pumped to and from the engine via a filter and often an oil cooler.

The advantages of a wet sump are the HP gains as mentioned above and also the oil pan can be smaller which in turn allows the engine to be mounted lower which = better handling. In a wet sump the oil sloshes around during hard cornering which can mean the pump pickup is left exposed and no oil is picked up so some parts don't get lubed, you also get oil surges.



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There are 2 kinds of dry sump pumps a G-rotor and a gear pump. The G-rotor is perferred due the fact it can pump more volume, though the tolorances are tighter in a G-rotor and doesn't handle debree as well. Basically with a dry sump there is reduced windage and areation of the oil. When running a wet sump on a road course it requires the use of baffles and oil traps in the pan to reduce the chances of the pickup from loosing suction, the oil climbing up the back and front of the pan and from sloshing up the side of the pan coming in contact with the crank throws. A wet sump is simpler and maintance free for the most part.


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Also, you wouldn't be the first person to convert to dry sump only to find that there were some parts in the motor that actually relied upon all the oil splashing around...

Having the standard sump modified for greater capacity, windage and baffling is the best option. Plus, its much cheaper while still being effective in non-race circumstances.


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