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Discussion Starter #1
I was going to get a regulator and the one I was going to get is adjustable from 40-60 PSI. I wanted to know what would be the best number to adjust to for the best performance. I have a 97 Tibby FX. Thanks for the help <img src=/images/forums/snitz/moon.gif width=15 height=15 border=0>


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what mods do you have? In general, unless you are running Nitrous, or forced induction, a fuel pressure raise will not be necessary.


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>Leave it to Random to Needlessly complicate things.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a CAI, 2 1/4" exhaust, plugs, wires, tornado air management


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I am willing to bet money that you are assuming you need a fuel pressure regulator because of what you've been told about Hondas and Acuras.

Honda (and it's North-American offshoot Acura) uses MAP sensors on their engines to determine fuel needs of the car. MAP stands for Manifold Absolute Pressure. It's a big-ass long name, but it's function is very simple: it measures the air pressure inside your intake manifold. The problem is, the air pressure inside your manifold doesnt' change much when you slap on modifications.

Even though the motor is getting maybe 20% more air than it used to, the pressure doesn't change, and as such the computer doesn't know to send more fuel. The H/A crowd fixes this by installing a higher pressure fuel regulator.

Our cars do not work this way.

The Hyundai Tiburon/Elantra lineup (well, I should say MOST of the Elantras) uses a MAF sensor -- Mass Air Flow. Rather than detecting air pressure, it actually detects total air mass that's coming into the motor. More modifications = more air coming in, and as such the computer can see the additional air and make appropriate changes to fuel.

The only time you need to adjust fuel pressure is when you have a modification that either the computer cannot see as air (nitrous) or when the total airflow exceeds the MAF's ability to read it all (supercharged / turbocharged)

The stock MAF sensor is good for around 180-210 flywheel horsepower (depending on temperature); you have lots more modifications to go before you touch that mark.
 

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How do you like that Tornado management system? Does it really improve power?


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>'01 Cardinal Red Tiburon
17" Nakayama Shumacher Racing Wheels
AOS CAI, Magnecor Wires
Zex Hyperformance Plugs
Sony Xplode system
MTX Subwoofers
Shark Racing Strut bars
Cat-back exhaust, yellow front and back grill
Flame graphics, Indiglo Gauges
 

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Based on what you say, so the pressure regulator should work with Hyundais that have the MAP sensor installed right?


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Yup a fuel pressure regulator should work fine on the Asian maped cars, but you should look into a fuel pump/SAFC as well, if you just crank up the fuel pressure the stock pump may not be able to keep up and the SAFC will allow you to trim the fuel since at lower rpm your going to be dumping lots of gas.


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>[h1]Tiburon Driver Wannabe[/h1]
http://webhome.idirect.com/~trini
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I love my tornado. As soon as you put it in you can tell a difference in low end power and a snappier take off <img src=/images/forums/snitz/moon.gif width=15 height=15 border=0>


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