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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 01 Tib and bought a 17" Nakayama Shumacher wheels. It brought the height of the car a bit higher. My question is, if I lower it with eibach springs, will I be needing a camber kit?


<hr noshade width=60% size=1 align=left>'01 Cardinal Red Tiburon
17" Nakayama Shumacher Racing Wheels
AOS CAI, Magnecor Wires
Zex Hyperformance Plugs
Sony Xplode system
MTX Subwoofers
Shark Racing Strut bars
Cat-back exhaust
 

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I have always heard that you only need a camber kit if you lower more than 2 inches and the Eibach kit only lowers 1.3.


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>TSR #250

"and the number one question recieved by a Tiburon driver......"

What's a Tiburon?
 

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a camber kit is recommended if you alter your suspension at all.


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>my car is yellow. [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so, does that mean, yes I need one or no, I don't need one?<img src=/images/forums/snitz/oogle.gif width=15 height=15 border=0>


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>'01 Cardinal Red Tiburon
17" Nakayama Shumacher Racing Wheels
AOS CAI, Magnecor Wires
Zex Hyperformance Plugs
Sony Xplode system
MTX Subwoofers
Shark Racing Strut bars
Cat-back exhaust
 

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14,259 Posts
it means it is recommended, but it is always your choice to get one or not.


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>my car is yellow. [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
will it be bad for the car if I don't get one.
Some people say that I don't need them.
Does the Eibach springs stiffen up the suspension?


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>'01 Cardinal Red Tiburon
17" Nakayama Shumacher Racing Wheels
AOS CAI, Magnecor Wires
Zex Hyperformance Plugs
Sony Xplode system
MTX Subwoofers
Shark Racing Strut bars
Cat-back exhaust, yellow front and back grill
Flame graphics, Indiglo Gauges
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If camber kit is needed, then where do I get the kit?


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>'01 Cardinal Red Tiburon
17" Nakayama Shumacher Racing Wheels
AOS CAI, Magnecor Wires
Zex Hyperformance Plugs
Sony Xplode system
MTX Subwoofers
Shark Racing Strut bars
Cat-back exhaust, yellow front and back grill
Flame graphics, Indiglo Gauges
 

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its not necessarily bad for the car, but if you have good tires it will wear through them fast if your camber is off (i should know, i've been through 2 sets of nitto nt450's). the kit can be aquired at www.tirerack.com it shouldn't be too much, i payed $25 for mine.

note: i have a 1.3in drop all around on h&r's w/ 17's and i've worn through a set of tires in 3-4 months b/c of my camber. so just take that into consideration. <img src=/images/forums/snitz/thumbup.gif width=25 height=18 border=0>


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>my car is yellow. [email protected]
 

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I think the Kit is needed depending on how you change your original suspension settings. Going for 17" wheels is deffinitely a big change, lowering the car 1.5" with stiffer springs is big on behaviour, but not too big in suspension. But, combine various modifications and you'll probably need the kit. I run on H&R springs (1.5" drop) and 15" wheels (overall wheel dianmeter has changed only 2%) and I have no alignement kit, I checked my meassures and they are within factory tolerances, amd mi tires wear as they should. <img src=/images/forums/snitz/wink.gif width=15 height=15 border=0>


<hr width=60% noshade size=1 align=left>Zman
H&R Springs/KYB Shocks/SR Strut Bars (F&R)
Future: CAI / BBT
 

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look this is a direct quote from motorage and not my own .... on with the info ....
<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>Camber

The camber angle refers to the inward or outward tilt of the tire when viewed from the front or rear of the vehicle. Negative camber exists when the top of the tire leans inward. If the top of the tire leans outward, positive camber exists. If the tire is positioned at a true vertical, it's set at zero-camber. Camber angles are measured in degrees. The camber angle is adjusted to maximize tire wear, handling and directional stability.

The majority of passenger vehicles are designed to use a slight positive camber angle at the front wheels. This is done to reduce steering effort, to increase highway-speed directional control (less road wander at speed), and to compensate for the added weight of driver and passengers. It's common for performance drivers and road-course competition drivers to request a negative camber at the front wheels, in order to maximize tire tread contact in severe turns. Though the front wheels may be set in a severe -- say, three degree -- negative camber and tire tread contact may be diminished when the vehicle travels straight (chances are, the inner tread only will actually contact the road), when the vehicle enters a hard right hand turn, the tire tries to flex and 'roll-over.' The result is full-tread contact of the left front tire during the turn. With full-tread contact in a hard turn, the driver maximizes his tire 'bite,' and is able to better grip the road surface. Keep in mind that this is primarily true on ly in dry road conditions. In severe wet-surface conditions, there may not be sufficient tire grip to generate enough rollover to obtain a full-width tread contact patch. In that case, a camber setting closer to zero would likely perform better. However, because it's impractical to readjust the alignment every time the weather changes, performance drivers must choose between an optimum dry or optimum wet weather setting, or make a slight compromise between the two optimum settings.
Adjustment of the front axle camber angle varies with suspension design. On double-A-arm (upper and lower control arms) designs, the upper control arm's frame may require that flat shims be added or removed to adjust camber. If the upper control arm's pivot shaft is located outboard of the frame, adding shims will move the wheel in a positive direction, while removing shims will move the wheel in a negative direction. If the pivot shaft is located inboard of the frame, shims are added to create negative camber and removed to create positive camber.

On strut-type front suspensions, camber adjustment may take place at either the top strut tower (moving the top of the strut inboard for negative camber or outboard for positive) or at the bottom of the strut bracket where it bolts to the spindle. Far too often, vehicle manufacturers offer little or no camber adjustment provision. In this case, the use of aftermarket camber plates at the top or eccentric bolts or bushings at the bottom are required. Usually, if the adjustment is to be made at the lower strut bracket, the upper mounting hole will be the stationary point, while the lower hole will provide angle movement.

On vehicle with I-beam front suspensions, one practice is to adjust camber by bending the I-beams. Though some debate always has existed regarding this practice, special bending fixtures are available and the procedure can be successful in trained hands. However, this is not a job for the novice. If you plan to purchase a bending machine, make sure that you receive the proper training in its use.

On vehicles with rear camber adjustment (rear axles on some FWD cars, and independent rear suspensions), camber may be adjusted with the use of shims at the hubs or by adjusting eccentric pivot bushings.


<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote>

sorry for the length
 
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