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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Phenolic Spacer Installation DIY

These instructions should be adequate to install a phenolic spacer on your 1.6l DOHC Accent. Most of the instructions are also correct for a 1.5l SOHC and some of them are basically universal. If I don't cover something feel free to ask for questions or clarification.

I got my phenolic spacer from JRM here on the forum.

For additional pictures see here: 187sks/Accent/Phenolic Spacer - Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Disconnect your negative battery cable. You will be working with your fuel system and this is truly a required step for this job in my eyes.

Remove your air intake. If you have a CAI or factory intake tubing remove enough parts to allow you to work freely around the intake manifold. If you have a short ram intake remove the entire intake. (shown partially disassembled)


Now if you have not done it before you should do the throttle body coolant bypass mod. This will maximize the results of the phenolic spacer. In fact if you skip this step the phenolic spacer will be of little use as these two mods really go together.

Disconnect at both ends and remove coolant line which connects to the driver's side throttle body inlet. This hose will be discarded.


Disconnect throttle body end of the passenger's side throttle body coolant line and connect it to the thermostat area where you just removed the other coolant line from. This loops the coolant back around into the block instead of heating up your throttle body. (shown installed)


Now that the TB coolant bypass mod is taken care of lets continue. Disconnect the brake booster vacuum line and a bunch of sensor connectors. If it hooks to the intake manifold and doesn't plug into the fuel rail disconnect it.


Continue to disconnect all electrical connections. Disconnect bracket on back of intake manifold. Unbolt fuel rail. Disconnect fuel injector plugs as required for access.




Pull to disengage fuel injectors from the head and loosen Fuel rail


Rotate fuel rail assembly to allow for easier access to intake manifold bolts as shown


Disconnect anything interfering with your access including ISA




Remove 4 side nuts, 3 top center bolts, and 2 bottom center nuts on the intake manifold flange. The bolts on the top can be removed with a wobble extension or a box end wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
The bottom nuts are most easily accessed from the bottom. It's difficult but you can reach them by hand. A stubby wrench helps. Also disconnect and remove the Intake manifold stay at top and bottom, 4 bolts.


Now the intake manifold should be free enough to pull out of the way


It does not need to be removed, just pulled out of the way enough to install the gaskets and spacer.


I recommend installing the the phenolic spacer with a gasket on each side.

intake manifold|gasket|phenolic spacer|gasket|head

You can try to install the spacer alone but I don't recommend it as the spacer is basically non-compressible as far as I could tell. New gaskets were less than $4 each at the dealership.

Note that the spacer and gaskets are not symmetrical. You need to install them facing the correct way. As shown in this picture the top gasket needs to be flipped around with the lettering facing up to fit.


Here you see the intake manifold out of the way allowing me to place a gasket against the head and then install the phenolic spacer. The phenolic spacer fits very tight. You may need to gently tap it down into place with a small hammer. Do not pound on the phenolic spacer, gently tap it into place keeping it pretty even on both sides.


After the phenolic spacer is in place slide the second gasket over the studs and then the intake manifold.


Snug down the intake manifold carefully using the 4 side studs. Do not forget the chassis to engine ground strap as shown in this picture. It should be under the nut shown on the stud.


Once all 4 side studs have nuts holding the intake manifold firmly install the 3 top center bolts.

*Note that these 3 factory bolts barely grip the threads in the head. If you try to tighten these bolts down you will strip the threads in the head. I stripped one myself. The studs on the sides and bottom have no danger of stripping. The solution is to go to your local hardware or fastener store (Home Depot carries them) and pick up 3 8mm-1.25 x50mm bolts.

Then install the bottom nuts onto the studs and tighten. Replace the intake manifold stay while you're down there.

Tighten all intake manifold flange nuts to final spec. Only tighten intake manifold flange bolts (if not using extended bolts) to snug tight.

Next rotate the fuel rail and re-insert the injectors into the head. Once satisfied with the position bolt the fuel rail into place.

Bolt bracket back onto the rear of the intake manifold.

Reinstall the ISA.

Reconnect electrical connectors, brake booster vacuum hose, and throttle cable.

Reinstall air intake.

Start car and check for rough idle due to vacuum leaks or missing electrical connectors. If you properly tightened all nuts and bolts and connected everything there should be no noticeable difference in the way your car idles.

Take your car for a hard drive and appreciate the improved sustained acceleration due to the lack of heat soak. A long acceleration run pulls a lot harder than before the phenolic spacer.

If you want you can check the temperature to impress yourself with how well this works!







Compared to the ambient temperature a rise of only 4 degrees is pretty impressive to me
 

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whats the gain here?
 

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What do you mean by gain? You drop the intake manifolds temperatures which give you a cooler intake charge and the colder the air going into the engine the more power built
 

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Ever notice a car runs better when it's cold out compared to when it's hot? Think of it as the same thing kinda.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
whats the gain here?
It was significant. I especially notice it during long highway pulls. The car pulls harder for longer. I ran on the dyno after installing this but it was too difficult of an installation process for me to be willing to run back to back. My car held at 99hp (same as my last dyno) but most people dropped between 5 and 13 horsepower compared to the previous dyno day so since I didn't lose any power I would say it helped, but I didn't get numbers to back it up.

I will tell you that after my short ram intake I think this was the best bang for my buck.
 

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It was significant. I especially notice it during long highway pulls. The car pulls harder for longer. I ran on the dyno after installing this but it was too difficult of an installation process for me to be willing to run back to back. My car held at 99hp (same as my last dyno) but most people dropped between 5 and 13 horsepower compared to the previous dyno day so since I didn't lose any power I would say it helped, but I didn't get numbers to back it up.

I will tell you that after my short ram intake I think this was the best bang for my buck.
are those temperatures after a drive? and did you do the same temperature comparison before you installed it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
are those temperatures after a drive? and did you do the same temperature comparison before you installed it?
Yeah, that's right after a HARD drive for about 15 minutes or so. I didn't do a before and after because I borrowed the thermometer and had the intake and stuff off of the car already so I would have had to put it back together, then run it, then let it cool down, then do the install. Plus I had to do it all Friday night before the 9:00am Saturday dyno. I would have loved to do a back to back comparison but it wasn't in the cards for me. I'll try to do a comparison on my friend's LC2 when I get a chance. Or someone can test their own and post their results.
 

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The LC2, with 187sks' aftermarket header with no heatshield, and no increased cooling, I'd guess that 187sks engine bay is one of the hotter running ones.

I have the LC with the half radiator (increased cool air into engine bay), and heat shield on the exhaust, and my engine bay is usually much cooler.

I guess I'm saying that most people, both LCs and LC2s, both 1.5s and 1.6s, should notice more of a difference than he does.
 

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u think painting the heat shield with a ceremic cote would lower engine bay temp a little or no?
 

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i would get the headers coated. don't use ceramic coat either that **** sucks. There is a company in tampa here that has a coating that comes in different colors but they showed me a test on and aluminum piston with the coating and took an oxy accetelene torch to the top of the piston and it took about 10 minutes for the torch to penetrate the coatings and melt the piston. I had my boys headers coated on his sprint car and you can touch them after about 3 minutes of the engine being off. They don't let heat out for nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yesterday I installed a BBTB and had my intake manifold off to do a port matching to the BBTB and polish it up a bit while I was at it but this gave me a chance to figure out the replacement bolts required to make this work right on the top 3 bolts.

The longer bolts required are 8mm-1.25 x 50mm. Home Depot carries them as well as many other places. Pick up 3 of these babies and you'll be golden.
 
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