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Okay Boys And Girls.....Class is about to begin. I was going wait until I finished doing a few more FAQ pages, but instead, I'm just gonna include this here so if anyone ever had any questions, they would be all set! Well, lots of good information here, so happy knowledge gaining!

<b>Standard Suspension</b>

Your Hyundai probably weighs in the neighborhood of 2500-3000 pounds. On a smooth straightaway it can easily travel at the legal speed limit, be it 55, 65, or even 75 mph. Unfortunately life is not a smooth straightaway. Instead it has cracks, dips, potholes, and bumps, as well turns and twists and curves. Your large pound mass of a Hyundai traveling at say 65, maintains contact with the Earth’s surface, by the scant size of the tires footprints…the total of 16 or so square inches where the rubber of 4 tires actually meets the road. We all know or can easily imagine the stresses and forces exerted on the tires considering the vehicles mass when those bumps and curves are encountered at speed. This brings us to suspension and shock absorbers, ride and handling, body roll, and over steer.

Very simply, suspension is a system of components, primarily springs, linkage, and shock absorbers, located between the vehicles frame and the axle designed to absorb energy. In other words, when a vehicle hits a bump, it’s the suspension that absorbs the energy created by the impact so it’s not transmitted violently through the tires into the body. Without a suspension system, every little imperfection in the roads surface would be translated into a violent force slamming into the body of the vehicle, resulting into discomfort for the passengers and damaging stress to the vehicle itself that results in those squeaks, rattles and cracks that we find in older cars. Obviously the tires are a critical component that must work well with the suspension. Without a suspension system, the upward motion of the tires when they hit a bump would launch the vehicle upward, resulting in loss of contact between the tires and the road. This of course, could cause loss of control at increased speeds.

Now for some definition lessons. Let’s begin with the “attitude” of the front wheels, including caster, camber, and toe in/toe out. Basically caster is the angle at which the wheel is attached to the vehicle. Consider a bicycle. The front wheel is not attached at the pivot directly beneath the frame, but rather at an angle. The front fork extends the front wheel out in front of the bike. The angle at which the wheel is affixed to the bike is the caster. All modern cars and trucks have caster. The upper ball joint and the lower ball joint, critical components of the suspension, essentially create the caster relative to their angle to the center of the wheel. Adjustment is made by moving the upper ball joint back, and the lower ball joint forward to place the spindle at 3 to 5 degrees of caster.

Camber is the side-to-side angle of the wheel. Imagine if you were flat on the ground looking straight ahead at the vertical angle of your cars front tire. Camber is measured relative to the ground, NOT relative to the chassis. Zero camber represents a perfectly vertical tire, which is considered optimum for braking and acceleration. Positive camber means the top of the tire is leaning away from the chassis. Negative camber means the top of the tire is leaning towards the chassis. When your car encounters bumps with both wheels usually go toward negative camber. The top of both the top loaded (weight bearing), and unloaded (non weight) bearing tires go toward the chassis. This is negative camber on both sides, even though one leans left and the other leans right.

Toe in/tow out is the difference in distance of the left to right measurements at the front and rear of the tire tread, on the same axle, measured at the center of the tread at spindle height. Toe in exists when the front measurement is less, while toe out exists when the rear measurement is less.

Now for some suspension components. The control arms simply provide a pivot point mounting the coil springs that put pressure on the control arms, which in turn hold the vehicle off the ground and suspend it. Spindles attach the upper and lower control arms to the wheel. This set up applies to both front corners, except in the case of vehicles with independent 4 wheel suspension, in which applies to all 4 corners.

The strut, a popular component on some model of vehicles, combines the shock absorber, spring, and upper control arm into one unit. All that is then required to complete a corner of the front suspension is a lower control arm, and a spindle, or in the case of front wheel cars…a steering knuckle. Struts like the MacPherson strut system work well on lighter vehicles, but are not beefy enough for heavier cars or trucks.

Stock suspension is what Hyundai considers to be the optimum ride height….ride and handling that will satisfy the largest number of potential buyers. The specs that direct the production of most factory vehicles are obviously not aimed at the enthusiasts. Peeps like us can modify the factory’s suspension by re-engineering it with quality aftermarket parts. As most of you know already, it’s possible to modify the stock suspension a great deal, and for the most part maintain the quality of ride and handling and still have a safe vehicle to drive. In order to do this, it’s best to understand what aftermarket suspension companies and products are available and what will work best for your situation.

Well, this has been Suspension 101…Getting To Know Your Suspension Components. Now that you are all experts on why your car turns, why you feel bumps more in one car over another, why your car goes over bumps easily, and what parts consist in your suspension buildup….you can go out and about in the world knowing more about your ride! *ha ha* ENJOY!!!!

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2k Low....if you don't have air..it ain't low enough...

"I live my life a quarter mile at a time..."
 

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Is it true, by using lowering springs and or a clamp to lower the car will cause the camber to be off? If so, will getting the car wheels aligned again correct the problem?
Any suspension suggestions for a 2000 Accent? Thanks!
<img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

Going from point A to point B in a Hyundai! I may be old school, but have been driving Hyundai's for many years!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote><b>Is it true, by using lowering springs and or a clamp to lower the car will cause the camber to be off? If so, will getting the car wheels aligned again correct the problem?</b><hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

Yes..you HAVE to get an alignment right after getting your car lowered, or else you run a risk of driving in an unsafe car, and you can also say goodbye to your tires. After you get an alignment, you'll be good to go until either you take the lowering suspension out, or if you hit a really bad bump/pot hole, and throw the elignment off again.

<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote><b>Any suspension suggestions for a 2000 Accent?</b><hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

Depends on how low you want to go, how much money you have to spend, how custom you want to get, and what kind of ride quality you want. Most people usually go with the normal drop springs. Make sure you get a good quality set so that they don't sag or squeek after installation.

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2k Low....if you don't have air..it ain't low enough...

"I live my life a quarter mile at a time..."
 

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After you get your new drop springs you may want to drive it for 500 miles or so. To let the springs settle then get it realigned. That is what I did and seemed to work ok.<img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>
 

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Thanks for the quick response!
I only want them for the front, with a minimum of 1 inch drop to a maximum of 1.5 inch drop. I don't want to feel every bump in the pavement!

If I replace the springs do I need to replace the shock or struts? (I've heard the shocks from the factory will blow out with lowering springs).

Would like a good set, but one's light on the $$$$$. Any suggestions? What about U bolts?


<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote><b>Is it true, by using lowering springs and or a clamp to lower the car will cause the camber to be off? If so, will getting the car wheels aligned again correct the problem?</b><hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

Yes..you HAVE to get an alignment right after getting your car lowered, or else you run a risk of driving in an unsafe car, and you can also say goodbye to your tires. After you get an alignment, you'll be good to go until either you take the lowering suspension out, or if you hit a really bad bump/pot hole, and throw the elignment off again.

<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote><b>Any suspension suggestions for a 2000 Accent?</b>[/quote]</font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

Depends on how low you want to go, how much money you have to spend, how custom you want to get, and what kind of ride quality you want. Most people usually go with the normal drop springs. Make sure you get a good quality set so that they don't sag or squeek after installation.

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<img src="http://www.fxtreme.org/members/2000Lo&ShowTibby/loandshow.gif" border=0>

2k Low....if you don't have air..it ain't low enough...

"I live my life a quarter mile at a time..."
[/quote]<img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

Going from point A to point B in a Hyundai! I may be old school, but have been driving Hyundai's for many years!
 

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Doc....with only a small drop like .5 to 1 inch, you can get away with using your factory struts/shocks..but they won't last as long. Your best bet is to get a good set of lowered struts/shocks like Koni, or Bilstein. Koni I believe are quite affordable.

I have to ask though. Why do you only want to drop the front end? Your car will have a Hot Rod look to it by the fact of the rear end will be sitting way up higher. Unless you plan on putting bigger tires and rims in the back, then it might look okay. Otherwise, trust me....more than likely you won't like the way your car looks by only having the front end dropped. By dropping all 4 corners, you get a nice even, chopped look. Besides, when you order a spring set, it will come with all 4 springs.

I know alot of peeps have the Eibach drop kit (only 1.2") and they kept they're factory shocks/struts in and the ride quality is still pretty good due to it not being that low of a drop. Also, Eibach is one of the best as far as ride handling goes.

Take some time and research different companies. The more homework you do and research you learn on different suspension componenets, the better and happier you'll be in the long end. <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

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2k Low....if you don't have air..it ain't low enough...

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Since, I have a heavy speaker box in the trunk it's already sitting lower in the rear. It looks as if front is sitting 2 inches higher than the back. Thanks for the suggestions <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>. I'll have to check them out!

Going from point A to point B in a Hyundai! I may be old school, but have been driving Hyundai's for many years!
 

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Checked out shocks recommended, but unfortunately I didn't find any for the Hyundai Accent. I have a 2000 any site suggestions?

Doc....with only a small drop like .5 to 1 inch, you can get away with using your factory struts/shocks..but they won't last as long. Your best bet is to get a good set of lowered struts/shocks like Koni, or Bilstein. Koni I believe are quite affordable.

I have to ask though. Why do you only want to drop the front end? Your car will have a Hot Rod look to it by the fact of the rear end will be sitting way up higher. Unless you plan on putting bigger tires and rims in the back, then it might look okay. Otherwise, trust me....more than likely you won't like the way your car looks by only having the front end dropped. By dropping all 4 corners, you get a nice even, chopped look. Besides, when you order a spring set, it will come with all 4 springs.

I know alot of peeps have the Eibach drop kit (only 1.2") and they kept they're factory shocks/struts in and the ride quality is still pretty good due to it not being that low of a drop. Also, Eibach is one of the best as far as ride handling goes.

Take some time and research different companies. The more homework you do and research you learn on different suspension componenets, the better and happier you'll be in the long end. <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

---------------------------------
<img src="http://www.fxtreme.org/members/2000Lo&ShowTibby/loandshow.gif" border=0>

2k Low....if you don't have air..it ain't low enough...

"I live my life a quarter mile at a time..."
[/quote]

Going from point A to point B in a Hyundai! I may be old school, but have been driving Hyundai's for many years!
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
Checked out shocks recommended, but unfortunately I didn't find any for the Hyundai Accent. I have a 2000 any site suggestions?
<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

go to tirerack.com or tires.com and they will both suggest the Eibach kit... and it's not that expensive so...

<img src="http://www.geocities.com/project_gsi/sig.jpg" border=0>

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Thanks knocker,

They had Eibach springs at www.tirerack.com but not www.tire.com. Any problems with factory shocks after installing springs?

Going from point A to point B in a Hyundai! I may be old school, but have been driving Hyundai's for many years!
 

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I don't want to lower my car any more than it already is (dented my 'tranny pan after bottoming out, bled red fluid all the way to the dealer), but I would like to take curves better. Any ideas?
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
I don't want to lower my car any more than it already is (dented my 'tranny pan after bottoming out, bled red fluid all the way to the dealer), but I would like to take curves better. Any ideas?<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

Front and rear anti-sway bars, and front and rear strut bars. Then you'll be able to take corners like they were nothing! <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>
Front and rear anti-sway bars, and front and rear strut bars. Then you'll be able to take corners like they were nothing! <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>
<hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" size=1 id=quote>

That is the setup I have and it handles great. But it will really handle once my under strut brace gets put on.<img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>
 
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